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October Wine Events

October Wine Events


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Autumn is upon us and with it, a myriad of wine-soaked activities. It won’t be long before lovely weather gives way to less-than-desirable temperatures, so we suggest getting out while the getting’s good. Below is just a snapshot of the top food and wine festivals this month. Whether you want to learn about wine-making or simply indulge in the end product, there's an event you won't want to miss.

2011 Texan Wine Month Trail, Austin, Oct. 1-31

Take the whole month to explore and enjoy the beauty of 27 wineries in the Texas Hill Country. Endless combinations of day trips are available, and each of the wineries will offer complimentary tastes. At only $15 per person, this event is a steal! Click here for tickets and information.

5th Annual Taste of Spirit Winetaster, Las Vegas, Oct. 7

Hosted by Spirit Therapies, a nonprofit organization that provides therapeutic horseback riding for individuals with special needs, this event features wine and beer tasting, a sit-down dinner, local musicians, a live auction, and raffle. All proceeds benefit the Spirit Therapies programs. Click here for tickets and information.

Around Napa Valley in 80 Sips, San Francisco, Oct. 7

Come taste world-renowned wines as Bottlenotes takes you Around Napa Valley in 80 Sips! Join us and fellow San Francisco wine enthusiasts. Enjoy 80-plus great Napa Valley wines, cheese, charcuterie, and more! Click here for tickets and information.

5th Annual Fall Wine Festival, Schaumburg, Ill., Oct. 8

More than 70 wines from all over the world will be available for sampling, and the best part is that this tasting is free! Anyone over 21 is welcome to join the fun and enjoy an afternoon of sipping. Click here for tickets and information.

21st Annual Wine & Garlic Festival, Amherst, Va., Oct. 8-9

A wonderful festival featuring Virginia wines, live entertainment, arts, crafts, and of course, garlic! Tastings by six regional wineries will be available in addition to five stages with live entertainment. Click here for tickets and information.

SF Magazine’s FallFest 2011, San Francisco, Oct. 9

San Francisco magazine presents FallFest 2011, a celebration of the Bay Area’s best in food and wine. Leading restaurateurs, winemakers, mixologists, and epicurean artisans join together for an inspiring day of premier wine and food tasting, chef demonstrations, cocktail competitions, and panel discussions. This party is not to be missed. Click here for tickets and information.

5th Annual Corks & Forks Wine and Food Pairing Event, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 13

A night of wonderful wines and delectable delights, this event will feature 25 local restaurants, 25 wineries, a high-end auction, and a raffle for a six-night trip to Paris, France! Tickets are $60 so be sure to get yours. Click here for tickets and information.

2011 TASTE Philadelphia Festival of Food, Wine and Spirits, Philadelphia, Oct. 21-23

Presented by Gourmet Shows, this year's Festival showcases the finest in wine, spirits, and gourmet foods. With more than 200 stations featuring ales, wines, food, and more, you’ll taste it all! Click here for tickets and information.

Tennessee Food and Wine Festival, Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 21-22

More than 100 food and wine vendors will sample and sell their products from Tennessee and the greater South. Chef demos and kids' culinary classes are offered in addition to great food and wine. Click here for tickets and information.

Project Zin, Healdsburg, Calif., Oct. 29

The first annual preeminent wine event that will showcase some of the most sought after zinfandels paired with delectable bites from top Sonoma chefs. Winemaker Clay Mauritson has teamed with renowned chef Charlie Palmer to host this memorable Healdsburg event in which proceeds benefit the Sonoma County Down Syndrome Support Group. Click here for tickets and information.


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Chicken Vesuvio

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

No one really knows who invented chicken Vesuvio, a roast chicken and potato dish in white wine sauce named after Mount Vesuvius, the volcano in Campania, Italy. Some believe the dish first appeared on the menu at Vesuvio, a well-known Chicago restaurant in the 1930s others believe it’s a riff on the roast chicken dishes that grandmothers in Southern Italy have been making for hundreds of years. (The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.) Whatever its origins, Chicagoans claim it as their own, and you can find it at almost every Italian-American restaurant in the Windy City. The dish always includes plenty of oregano and lemon juice, and usually a scattering of fresh or frozen peas for color. We reached out to La Scarola, one of the most popular Italian-American restaurants in Chicago, for their recipe, and then we adapted it for home cooks. Serve it with plenty of crusty bread, for sopping up the mouthwatering sauce. &mdashMargaux Laskey


Watch the video: OCTOBER WINE Western Blues (July 2022).


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